Violence continues in Myanmar as the military cracks down on dissent: NPR


0

Demonstrators march during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, on Sunday.

Stringer / AFP via Getty Images


Hide the caption

Toggle caption

Stringer / AFP via Getty Images


Demonstrators march during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, on Sunday.

Stringer / AFP via Getty Images

Myanmar’s security forces have killed more than 700 civilians since the February 1 coup, a human rights group reported over the weekend. At least 82 people were killed in the city of Pago on Friday during a crackdown against anti-coup protesters.

The actual death toll is likely much higher, according to Association for Aid to Political Prisoners (AAPP), Which tracked the dead since the start of the coup.

Soldiers used heavy weapons, including Machine guns and rocket propelled grenades In the attack on anti-regime protesters, according to New York times.

Eyewitnesses said to the attack Dead bodies The wounded were piled on top of each other in a nearby temple and a school.

“The bodies and the injured were dragged away,” he added [the troops]A man said ” Myanmar now.

Among the injured civilians, some sought medical treatment, but the army was denied any care, according to the association’s report on the attack. Survivors have fled the town since the attack.

The attack on Bago represents Third in a week The Associated Press reported that the junta used maximum force to try to stop the opposition.

Earlier in the week, attacks took place in Kalay and Taz, two towns where strongholds against the military rule were erected, according to the Associated Press. At least 11 people were killed in those attacks.

The army took power in February, Make a coup Against the National League for Democracy party led by civil leader Aung San Suu Kyi who was re-elected in November. Military officials made allegations of “election fraud” on a large scale, although the Election Commission did not find evidence to support this claim.

More than 3,000 people in Myanmar are currently in detention under the ruling junta, according to the association.

Calls for international assistance and intervention increased. Christine Schraner Burgner, the UN special envoy to Myanmar, arrived in Bangkok on Friday to work on resolving the crisis, the Associated Press reported. Earlier this month, Burgener warned of a potential “bloodbath” if the international community did not do more to address the violence.


Like it? Share with your friends!

0

What's Your Reaction?

hate hate
0
hate
confused confused
0
confused
fail fail
0
fail
fun fun
0
fun
geeky geeky
0
geeky
love love
0
love
lol lol
0
lol
omg omg
0
omg
win win
0
win
Joseph

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *